—A—

—B—

—C—

comment – rem (which will show that to the user but not execute) or #

—D—

data entry, ask for – SET /P IP= IPADDRESS: will present user with “IPADDRESS” and put it into a variable called %IP%

DNS server, set – note below that both “local” as a generic reference to your main network connection as well as “Local area connection” referring to the named connection both work

netsh interface ip set dns local static 192.168.254.13 primary

netsh interface ip add dns "Local area connection" 192.168.254.19

DNS service, restart

net stop "DNS Client"

net Start "DNS Client"

—E—

echo – repeat what you say after “echo” to the monitor

@echo off – after you issue this command, the “C” prompt won’t show up

environment variables – a list.  To see all the variables, type: set

Some samples

Variable

Type

Description

%COMPUTERNAME%

System

Returns the name of the computer.

%DATE%

System

Returns the current date. Uses the same format as the date /t command. Generated by Cmd.exe.

%ERRORLEVEL%

System

Returns the error code of the most recently used command. A non zero value usually indicates an error.

%OS%

System

Returns the operating system name. Windows 2000 displays the operating system as Windows_NT.

%PATH%

System

Specifies the search path for executable files.

%SYSTEMDRIVE%

System

Returns the drive containing the Windows XP root directory (that is, the system root).

%SYSTEMROOT%

System

Returns the location of the Windows XP root directory.

%TEMP% and %TMP%

System and User

Returns the default temporary directories that are used by applications available to users who are currently logged on. Some applications require TEMP and others require TMP.

%TIME%

System

Returns the current time. Uses the same format as the time /t command. Generated by Cmd.exe.

%USERDOMAIN%

Local

Returns the name of the domain that contains the user's account.

%USERNAME%

Local

Returns the name of the user who is currently logged on.

%WINDIR%

System

Returns the location of the operating system directory.

 

—F—

—G—

gateway, set – need to set IP address, mask and gateway metric (the “1” at the end) as well.  If you set the gateway, the gateway metric is not optional.

netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" source=static 192.168.254.43 mask=255.255.255.0 gateway=192.168.254.254 1

—H—

—I—

IP address, set dynamic –

netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" source=dhcp

IP address, set fixed – need to set mask as well.  The last two argument – gateway, and gateway metric (the “1” at the end) – are optional

netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" source=static 192.168.254.43 mask=255.255.255.0 gateway=192.168.254.254 1

—J—

—K—

—L—

—M—

—N—

—O—

—P—

—Q—

—R—

—S—

—T—

—U—

—V—

variable set – put variable name followed immediately by “=” and the value.  Can’t have spaces.  Well, you can, but then the space becomes part of the variable name itself.  For example:

set test=9

set test = 9

run set and you’ll see:

test=9

test = 9

where “test” is set to “9” and “test ” is set to “ 9”

Note that variable names are surrounded by percent signs when they're used but not when they're set (assigned).

variables, environment – see environment variables

—W—

—X—

—Y—

—Z—

—No's—